The most 'wonderful' time of the year ...

No I'm not mistaken, it's the most 'wonderful' time of the year!

Here we are again. It's THAT time of the year again when you long for spring, when winter seems to be really starting. And although in months it doesn't take that long for spring to arrive, it sometimes seems further away than ever when I look at the weather forecast. And while I walk through the rain with the dogs, the circumstances make me think back to last year. Because it has really been almost 1 year ago that Skipper entered our lives on a stormy Sunday in February.

Almost 1 year with Skipper, and Lana in heat again

Almost 1 year already… and believe me, I really don't always think about that. I have other things to do. But the heat of Lana that has started again made me think back for a moment. Lana comes into heat about twice a year, but in a weird way. She has a period in heat that lasts about 3 weeks, then it is about 2 to 3 months of rest, and then she is in heat again. As you can imagine, the periods when she is in heat are once very difficult with an intact male in the house. And last year this happened just 1 week after we took Skipper home. Poor guy then got his baptism of fire in the pack in a not so nice way. Just as he began to cautiously befriend Myla and Lana, and very cautiously began to put his trust in us, this shaky confidence was knocked out on all sides.



IMG_20200224_190554_403.jpg



I couldn't and cannot split myself in two

The cautious bond we began to build was severely broken and poor Skipper had to move into the kitchen. There was no beginning to keep him in the room with the other two dogs. Of course I couldn't and cannot split myself in two and that meant for poor Skipper that he was alone a lot. Not because we wanted it that way, but because unfortunately there was no other way. It was and is not an option to have puppies from Lana. She will turn 12 in April, and her age is also a reason not to have her sterilized. Even if that would make all problems disappear like snow in the sun. The risk is too great that Lana too would disappear like snow in the sun. And even though I can sometimes wish her to another planet with her stubborn behavior. She is also very sweet and loyal, and always a happy dog. So the risk that she wouldn't wake up from the anesthesia is just TOO great and we don't want to take it with her anymore.

Neuter one of the both dogs?

Then there was of course the choice to neuter Skipper if necessary, but that doesn't change anything for me. The problem would just persist with that. It's not that I'm afraid Skipper would be able to cover Lana. That is not going to happen, Lana is biting hard enough, she will not allow it, and I am always there to intervene. But Skipper's behavior is the problem. He's just horny to say the least. And I now know from experience that the behavior of many males is just as annoying even after neutering. They still have nothing wrong with their noses and the hormones may be a bit less, but they are not completely gone. Rowan and Lex were both neutered males, and both were just as annoying during the times when Lana was in heat. So why should we spend money to have a dog neutered if the behavior would only decrease a little bit. Nope… we are not going to. Also because we neither want Skipper to be neutered. He is not a too dominant male, he is not always sure of himself… and normally listens well. In addition, he is only 2 years old and not yet fully grown and certainly not yet fully grown in character. Castration can influence all of this in a positive as well as a negative way. And you don't know that in advance. Chemical castration you say?

But we don't neuter horny men, right?

Yes we could do. But… chemical castration can also have far-reaching consequences for your dog. And let me be honest, a man who is horny is not immediately neutered, right? Okay, you don't believe me right away ...

Many related health problems can occur

When we talk about castration, I mean removing Lana's uterus and ovaries… because yes, that is also castration. And this is taken for granted by about 90% of dog owners. They buy a bitch, oh bitch is in heat, we don't want that. So bitch is 'helped'. That the bitch thus becomes much more sensitive to many health problems, is ignored. The same applies to a male of course. People think the male is a bit dominant… and let him help. Because he was so dominant.



IMG_20200407_144739_477.jpg



But what are the possible consequences for the dogs?

Possible long-term negative consequences depending on the age at which castration takes place

As a small puppy (before the age of 6 months)

  • Musculoskeletal System: An abnormal growth of the musculoskeletal system leads to longer and lighter bones. Research also shows that there is a greater chance of an anterior cruciate ligament lesion, ED and on HD. In male dogs, joint problems arise due to rapid growth and muscle weakness; the role of testosterone (including muscle development) is no longer fulfilled.
  • Genitals: Relatively underdeveloped external genitals (penis and vulva). This often leads to inflammation of the foreskin and the skin around the vulva. Greater risk of neutering, cystitis and vaginal inflammation. The neutered male can become attractive to other (intact) male dogs. Neutered males can ride each other.
  • Tumors: Greater chance of developing a hemangiosarcoma (malignant blood tumor) and bone tumors. Depending on the race, the risk of other types of tumors may also be increased.
  • Behavior: More anxiety-related behavioral problems. For example, an insecure male can become more afraid, which can turn his behavior into fear-aggression. In bitches a clear chance of aggressive and masculine behavior (driving, urinating with paws up) after castration if the bitch had several brothers. Negative influence on behavioral development, especially with castration during the socialization period.
  • Brain function: More deterioration of cognitive functions (dementia).
  • Thyroid: Increased risk of underactive thyroid gland and becoming fat.
  • Narcosis: Greater risk of anesthesia than with no castration or castration at a later age.
  • Prostate: Increased risk of prostate tumors.
  • Coat: risk of developing a “fluffy” coat, especially in long-haired dogs: the coat becomes thicker, more curly, more difficult to maintain.

In puberty, age is different in small or large dogs

  • Movement device: longer and lighter bones, greater risk of anterior cruciate ligament lesions, joint problems due to too rapid growth and less muscle development.
  • Genitals: Increased risk of castration uncleanliness. The neutered male can become attractive to other (intact) male dogs. Neutered males can ride each other.
  • Tumors: Greater chance of developing a hemangiosarcoma (malignant blood tumor). Depending on the race, the risk of other types of tumors may also be increased.
  • Behavior: More anxiety-related behavioral problems. For example, an insecure male can become more afraid, which can turn his behavior into fear-aggression. In bitches a clear chance of aggressive and masculine behavior (driving, urinating with paws up) after castration if the bitch had several brothers. Negative influence on behavioral development.
  • Brain function: More deterioration of cognitive functions (dementia).
  • Thyroid: Increased risk of underactive thyroid gland and becoming fat.
  • Prostate: Increased risk of prostate tumors. h.
  • Coat: Likelihood of developing a “fluffy” coat, especially in long-haired dogs: the coat becomes thicker, more curly, more difficult to maintain.

As an adult dog

  • Movement device: greater risk of anterior cruciate ligament lesions, joint problems due to less muscle development.
  • Genitals: Increased risk of castration uncleanliness. The neutered male can become attractive to other (intact) male dogs. Neutered males can ride each other.
  • Tumors: Greater chance of developing a hemangiosarcoma (malignant blood tumor). Depending on the race, the risk of other types of tumors may also be increased.
  • Behavior: More anxiety-related behavioral problems. For example, an insecure male can become more afraid, which can turn his behavior into fear-aggression. In bitches a clear chance of aggressive and masculine behavior (driving, urinating with paws up) after castration if the bitch had several brothers.
  • Brain function: More deterioration of cognitive functions (dementia).
  • Thyroid: Increased risk of underactive thyroid gland and becoming fat.
  • Prostate: Increased risk of prostate tumors.
  • Coat: risk of developing a “fluffy” coat, especially in long-haired dogs: the coat becomes thicker, more curly, more difficult to maintain.

Not necessarily that your dog is going to suffer

Of course, your dog is not necessarily going to suffer from any of the above mentioned consequences. But the odds are seriously higher than you might think.



IMG_1564920025564.jpg



My dear Rowan probably died because of these consequences

Research has shown that the tumor that Rowan died of was a result of the lack of a certain type of male hormone. The fact that he developed these tumors can be related to the castration he received at the age of 11 months. Can this be said with certainty? No, maybe not. But the probability is likely that it is related to each other.

Myla suffers from a slight incontinence

Myla has been neutered. The result is that she no longer comes into heat, no that not. She is not bothered by that. Skipper doesn't get that crazy about her either. Fortunately, Myla has always been very sweet in character, but if she had been as bitchy as Lana is in character. Then we had a real problem and the two ladies would never have gotten along. That much is certain. Lana is already a very dominant bitch, she always urinates with one paw up and if she could, she kept two up. She snarls and snarls at every dog ​​in her neighborhood and that behavior could possibly get even worse if we had her neutered. No thanks, she's tough enough without castration. In addition, she is often not toilet trained even without castration. With castration it is almost a guarantee that she will suffer from it even more. Myla does not want to be untrained, but she does suffer from incontinence at times due to her castration. And in addition, it is certain that an arthrosis has developed in Myla, and yes ... you guessed it, that is also due to the lack of estrogens in her case.

For the health of all dogs, think twice!

So you see again, having a dog is nice, but it also has its less pleasant sides. And for the health of all dogs… people should take more into account in advance. Since we chose Skipper, we have done this with a conscious understanding of this problem. And choosing an intact male means that you will also receive these kinds of weeks as a gift. Annoying? Yes, absolutely! But the problems we can get from neutering are not worth it to me.

We have to deal with it ...

So no castration of Skipper, castration of Lana… neither is it an option. Dealing with the situation is the only way to go now, and luckily it has been resolved twice a year. Glad a dog doesn't go into heat every month like women. And now let's see if I will order the natural remedy again, which I also tried with Lana her heat last year in May. In the end, that gave Skipper and us a little more peace of mind, and it was a lot cheaper and more healthy than castration!



0
0
0.000
2 comments
avatar

pixresteemer_incognito_angel_mini.png
Bang, I did it again... I just rehived your post!
Week 42 of my contest just started...you can now check the winners of the previous week!
!BEER
1

0
0
0.000