More Experimentation With Work Week

There is serious attention being paid to the work week and the idea of work-life balance.

image.png
Source

With automation starting to penetrate more industries, especially white collar jobs, serious consideration is being given to how hard people work. Presently, the restaurant industry is looking to automate to make up for worker shortage.

We also see a lot of discussion surrounding the remote work situation. Many are terming it "work from anywhere", which could affect a host of other areas. We are potentially looking at a complete disruption of real estate, both commercial and residential.

4 Day Work Week

A theory that is being experimented with is the idea of a four-day work week. While this sounds absurd, it is vital to remember that there was a time when 6 day was common for people to work. Factories were open Monday through Saturday, with offices and retail following. The only day you could count on being closed was Sunday.

About a century ago, the 40 hour week became commonplace. As productivity was increased due to automation, we see how an economy needed less working hours to push out the basic needs of the society.

Could we be seeing another change taking place?

There was an experiment that took place in Iceland and the UK. There were 2,500 people who took part in the trial from 2015-2019. These employees saw a reduction of hours to 35-36 hours with no loss of pay. They also had flexibility built into their contracts.

The result of the trail, that included 1% of the population, has now spread to the rest of the population.

The researchers estimate that as a result of new agreements struck in 2019-2021 after the trials ended, 86 per cent of Iceland’s entire working population now either have reduced hours or flexibility within their contracts to reduce hours.

Source

People are starting to look at the overall balance and how much time we put in "at the office". Some countries are taking a more aggressive approach than others. Yet, as we see with the remote work debate, employees are starting to say enough.

There Is No Reason To Act Like It Is 1980

We have come a long way in the last 30 years in terms of technology. The manufacturing industry received a huge increase in productivity due to robotics and automation. This reduced the number of workers yet the total amount manufactured increased.

Nowhere is this more evident than in the office environment. The introduction of the Internet really changed the way the world communicated. As we saw the networked environment grow, digitization took over. This altered the way office workers interact. It also changed our relationship to information.

Software companies helped in this endeavor. They designed better management tools which, if utilized, can track what employees are doing. The last 40 years focused upon productivity, a goal that has been accomplished.

Welcome to the modern era. We are highly productive and it is not going to diminish. Each technological iteration only serves to grow our productivity. That is why the numbers we are dealing with get bigger over time.

Do you think the automobile industry would be able to pump out tens of millions of cars they do a year without automation? We are now pumping out 50% more cars than we did 60 years ago.

Logistical operations also made it much easier to move products around the world. Not only can we produce more but we can move it more efficiently than ever before.

All of this ties back to employment. We are becoming wealthier in total due to this productivity yet still maintain this insistence to keep working at maximum pace. Of course, left to make the decision, corporations will keep asking for more, right up to the point where they let people go if times turn bad or they are able to automate the job out.

Since this it the case, we see how a lack of loyalty on either side exists. Hence, employees need to take it upon themselves to change the situation.

Of course, automation is going at such a pace, it might not be relevant. If some estimates are correct, there will be hundreds of millions around the world who are basically automated out by the end of the decade.

For now, it is vital that we keep experimenting with ways to improve the work atmosphere while maintaining productivity. This is something that will help us as we enter into discussion on larger questions which are going to arise as technology keeps advancing.


If you found this article informative, please give an upvote and rehive.

gif by @doze

screen_vision2025_1.png

logo by @st8z

Posted Using LeoFinance Beta



0
0
0.000
12 comments
avatar

pixresteemer_incognito_angel_mini.png
Bang, I did it again... I just rehived your post!
Week 64 of my contest just started...you can now check the winners of the previous week!
!BEER
3

0
0
0.000
avatar

Interesting sir

For now, it is vital that we keep experimenting with ways to improve the work atmosphere while maintaining productivity.

indeed this is the most appropriate thing to do, in as much as we expect better days to come


Posted via proofofbrain.io

0
0
0.000
avatar

I have a feeling companies are going to have to do this to keep employees interested. There is going to be some competition for workers, at least the top ones.

Posted Using LeoFinance Beta

0
0
0.000
avatar

yes that will also create a sense of responsibility in the minds of the workers, thereby making them to step up their games to =wards being selected and awarded

0
0
0.000
avatar

Workers tend to have a big advantage if they are aware. That said, the push for #automation is going to make things tough. The key for people is to have choices. So expanding their capabilities is vital.

Posted Using LeoFinance Beta

0
0
0.000
avatar

I was puzzled that in Europe there are short work weeks, until I spoke to somebody who explained that with high unemployment, shortening work weeks means that more people have to get hired. More people are able to participate in the workforce this way.

With deflationary pressures and automation, we may find it necessary to do something similar rather than the suggested UBI that gets floated around.

Posted Using LeoFinance Beta

0
0
0.000
avatar

With deflationary pressures and automation, we may find it necessary to do something similar rather than the suggested UBI that gets floated around.

Without a doubt, this is the best it can be. It will only get worse from here as #automation keeps increasing. We are going to see this affect #employment as we proceed forward.

Posted Using LeoFinance Beta

0
0
0.000
avatar

Congratulations @taskmaster4450le! You have completed the following achievement on the Hive blockchain and have been rewarded with new badge(s) :

You have been a buzzy bee and published a post every day of the week

You can view your badges on your board and compare yourself to others in the Ranking
If you no longer want to receive notifications, reply to this comment with the word STOP

To support your work, I also upvoted your post!

Check out the last post from @hivebuzz:

Feedback from the July 1st Hive Power Up Day - ATH Volume record!
0
0
0.000
avatar

As things get automated, people will naturally get less hours. It just doesn't make sense when robots will do exactly what people don't like doing. Also employees are liabilities since they are likely to cause more legal issues and taxes.

Posted Using LeoFinance Beta

0
0
0.000
avatar

That sounds like #Keynes who said that we would be working 15 hours weeks in the 30s or 40s. He missed that one a bit.

Of course, the pace of #automation now means the work week will have to decline at some point. We simply are seeing #robots and computers taking over more things.

Posted Using LeoFinance Beta

0
0
0.000